Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Garden Update

Well, it is about time I do a garden update.  Luckily a few things continue to produce despite my severe neglect.  Tomatoes, peppers, and cukes continue to ripen despite the cool night temperatures.  Raspberries and green beans are still producing, and then there are those leeks that I will be harvesting in the months to come.  Almost all greens have been eaten by creatures, only the carrots under plastic protection remain from my many, many sowings in recent months.  Thank goodness the chard from spring is 'cut-and-come-again' or I would have nothing green and leafy to harvest.  Ever.

I am dying to know what the sweet potatoes will give this year.  They are vining like mad, but the last time I peaked in there was not any tuber formation to speak of.  I am behaving and staying out of there for now, and desperately hoping for some kind of harvest in October.

The Yellow Potato Onions arrived (and there they sit in their box).  These are multiplying onions.  Think shallots...only onions, and that about sums them up.  I keep telling myself they are all I will grow for onions next year, but who am I kidding?  I just need a bigger plot.  These babies will need a few years to get established and start providing more than seed.

9 comments:

meemsnyc said...

All of our greens are swiss cheese. Bugs and critters keep eating them. I think I have to rethink my strategy for next year.

Engineeredgarden said...

Oh, I can't wait to see your sweet potatoes, either! Please post about them when harvested...

Erin said...

Ugh, I can't seem to get greens either this year! Last year I had no problems, but the bugs have been the worst this year!

Lorie said...

I agree, can't wait to see your sweet potatoes. Sure hope your patience pays off. They are so yummy.

Thomas said...

If there's ever a year for a good sweet potato harvest, it's this one. Hopefully you are pleasantly surprised.

Kelly said...

Boy, I hope I get a decent tater harvest. Last year it was puny, but they were so delicious!!! I have not been good about watering which is making me nervous. Have any of you tried eating the leaves? I cooked some up last night for dinner with a little garlic and they were actually better than I was expecting.

thyme2garden said...

I can't wait to hear about your sweet potato harvest, Kelly! I would love to see some pictures of those prolific vines, too! I remember a blogger (Mac, I think?) posting about edible sweet potato leaves earlier this summer. I'm glad to hear that you thought them tasty. I will put it on my list of "foods never tried, but I should when I get a chance."

Ruralrose said...

I didn't know what to do with the multiplyer onions I planted last year, and of course, in due course, they all went to seed. I have saved said seed and yet, sadly, have no more idea than before. How do they multiply if you eat them, if you don't eat them they go to seed, am I missing something? Let me know if you find out please. Peace

Kelly said...

My information doesn't mention the onions going to seed. By seed, do mean bulbils at the top, or an actual flower head? If you get bulbils maybe you have Egyptian/ Walking/Topset Onions??

The paperwork that came with my onions suggests one holds off on water once the leaves begin to fall down; when 75% of the crop has fallen the crop is ripe and it is time to dig. Leave the onions that are still standing tall for another 7-10 days

If you think what you are speaking of may be topset onions, "they are usually grown as a source of onion greens, thus the purpose of harvesting is usually to transplant or increase the crop. If the bulbs are to be harvested for eating or transplanted, wait until stalks are mostly brown. Do not delay harvesting as some varieties may sprout within a week. The bulbils at the top may be used to flavor pickles or to increase the crop. Select only the largest, well-formed bulbils for increasing your stock."

Hope that helps RuralRose!!