Wednesday, August 5, 2009

Recent Harvests

Another couple of pounds from the potato patch, super-tiny shallots, and some beans'n greens.

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My biggest tomato harvest yet, guess I should go peruse those recipes I posted recently......


The shallots were dying back and needed to come out. The cloves are so small, can I just separate put them back in for next year? They almost aren't worth saving to eat.

One of my blogging friends is doing an e-book give away over at Life Throught The Cracks. She is concerned with the possibility of food shortages in our future and wants to promote food security, head on over and check it out!

6 comments:

Thomas said...

Nice looking tomatoes! I can't wait to grow some next year!

Kelly said...

Thanks Thomas. It really is such a joy to walk out the door and find tomatoes waiting for you!

Erin said...

Yes, you can plant those for next year, but they usually recommend planting the best out of your harvest. Jealous you are still getting greens from your garden! My potato vines are all dead now, and I have not been motivated to go out in the heat and dig!!!

Kelly said...

Erin (or anyone), should I put the bulbs back in now or wait a few months? Yeah, I don't know that I have a 'best one', they are all the size of a large clove of garlic. So sad considering what they cost.

Michelle said...

Looks lovely...and yummy! I have been making fresh salsa with tomatoes and jalapenos from the garden...it is SO tasty! Maybe you could whip up a batch?!

Erin said...

My shallots go in about the end of October, and were ready in May and were big then. I know some people plant them in the spring, but I think you gain size when planted in the fall. When the frost comes, they will just sit dormant, and start regrowing again early in the spring. Check your area's planting date, may be a little earlier since you are farther north, but I would wait til fall. I would cold store them for a little while, lots of bulbs like that need a cold period to stimulate winter before planting, I believe its called 'cold stratification'. Check shallot planting online with MA extension service, they usually have good info on planting dates.