Monday, August 31, 2009

The Summer That Never Was

June, July, and August 2009: 'The summer that never was'. At least that is what they are calling it over on Cape Cod. Today marks the last day of the Meteorological Summer. Officially there a few weeks left, but after a couple of evenings with temps in the 50's the final day of August certainly is feeling Autumn-like.

I went out to the garden this morning to find evidence of chores left unfinished....

This what happens when your weekends are over scheduled and you get behind on the lawn mowing and weeding thanks to all the rain (and the perfect beach day), and suddenly you realize you are already an hour late for a birthday party.
The Late Blight is really taking it's toll now, I expect this will be my last week of tomatoes. The fruit and stems are beginning to show evidence of the powdery spores. While picking the ripe fruit this morning I actually was OK with knowing these plants will be going soon, many people I know didn't get a single tomato out of their gardens, even the farmer's markets are scarce in some towns. I am thankful for the three months of home grown tomatoes I have enjoyed this summer. Below is picture of today's infected trimmings, another of the tomato harvest.
Here are my surviving winter squash plants, fighting to hold on despite the borer damage. If the buggers are done for the season then they may make it, but another attack would do them in. Two of them have formed new fruit, I am doing my best to not count my chickens before they hatch. I slit open the plastic mulch and covered a stem portion with soil, followed by a fish fertilizer cocktail to encourage new root growth. C'mon squash babies, GROW, GROW, GROW!
Speaking of growing, look at all these muskmelon vines growing madly in the compost pile and up the dog kennel....
And here is my single melon. Can I even call it that, lol? Should it instead be called "The Blossom That Never Died"?

8 comments:

Erin said...

Our summer was the same way, except for August, which was as hot and humid as I ever remember! Today, high of 72, yay! Hopefully the heat wave is over. I guess we were pretty lucky to get all of our tomatoes this year! I, too, am ready to put the tomatoes to bed for good this year...

Ruralrose said...

We had unbearable heat close to 100 degrees everyday for about a month. I have only 2 blossoms on my zucchini (usually have so much now I feed it to my chickens), and some tomatoes all still hard and green (1 month behind at least). I am taking some plants, tomatoes, peppers, cukes, basil in under a light for the winter. If we are having trouble I am sure the big growers are too. Here in BC a large percentage the fruit didn't get pollinated because of the low bee population. Good thing we see and are able to prepare for the winter. Love your posts, peace for all

Annie's Granny said...

Despite our unbearable heat, I was blessed with such a good harvest this year. Seems the only things I couldn't grow well were radishes and zucchini! You did get some beautiful tomatoes. Maybe next year will be warmer for you.

Kelly said...

Sounds like the weather pattern has been off for all regions this year. I am thankful for the abundance of rain as opposed to not getting enough. I do love Fall and am really looking forward to apple season.

donna said...

"The Blossom That Never Died"....that's funny. Go ahead and call it a melon because it looks a lot better than anything on my pumpkin plant. Wouldn't you think that handsome black dog would pick up the rake and get to work?

Kate and Crew said...

It's always hot and miserable in Florida in the summer and everything dies a horrible burning death here too. I'm impressed when I hear that anyone has any survivors!

Beegirl said...

We are getting things cleaned up here too! The two hours sleep was from working night shift on Sunday night. It was too nice out on Monday, I just couldn't sleep!! : )) Thanks for stopping by to say hello!

Thomas said...

I guess I didn't miss much this summer. :) Hopefully next summer will be accompanied by endless sunshine and warmth.
I left a longer response on my blog but to answer your question, I've read that adding greensand and rock phosphate when building the compost pile makes them more readily available to the plants when the finished compost is used in the garden. Also it cuts down on soil prep work.
Thanks for the suggestion! I will definitely check out Azomite!